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When everyone has a home

Housing advice for Northern Ireland

Housing Association

An area scheduled for redevelopment can contain properties owned privately or properties owned by housing associations or the Housing Executive. At least one third of the properties in a redevelopment area must be considered to be unfit for human habitation.

Moving can be stressful, complicated and expensive. Whether you’re moving in, moving on or moving out careful planning can make the process easier.

Housing associations and the Housing Executive can end a tenancy without going to court if they suspect that a property has been abandoned, but the correct procedure has to be followed. If you're worried about eviction you should speak to someone urgently. Advisers at Housing Rights may be able to help you stay in your home.

You may be entitled to compensation if you have to leave your home because the area its based in is scheduled to be redeveloped. Homeowners will be paid the current market value for their home and you might also be entitled to compensation for the disturbance. The Housing Executive should rehouse you if you can no longer live in your home because it is in a redevelopment area.

There are a few different things that can happen if you have to go to court for a possession hearing.

You normally have to be living in a property in order to claim and receive housing benefit. However, in certain circumstances you may be able to claim for a property that you're not actually living in. The length of time that you can claim for depends on why you can't live in the property.

If you fall behind on your rent, the Housing Executive or housing association can take steps to end your tenancy and evict you. Your landlord will need to get a court order before you'll have to leave the property and this will always be a last resort. Your landlord should try to sort the situation out with you before it starts legal action.

Squatters are people who occupy and live in a property despite having no legal right to live there. It’s not a realistic housing option because squatters can easily be evicted.

If you decide you no longer want to live in your home you need to formally end your tenancy. If you just leave without giving notice in writing your landlord could sue you for unpaid rent.

You may want to add someone else's name onto your tenancy.  This could happen if you originally moved into the property as a single person, but you now have a partner.  You need to get the Housing Executive or housing association's permission to create the joint tenancy. 

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